In Haiti, about 200,000 families (1 million people) have been affected by drought conditions since the beginning of 2015

In Haiti, about 200,000 families (1 million people) have been affected by drought conditions since the beginning of 2015, especially in Sud-Est, Nord-Ouest and Artibonite regions. These prolonged conditions are aggravating the situation of 3.8 million food-insecure people in the country.


http://reliefweb.int/disaster/dr-2015-000091-hti

21 Of The World’s Largest Aquifers Have Passed Their Sustainability Tipping Points

The latest data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites has revealed that 21 of the world's largest aquifers in locations from India to China and Australia have passed their sustainability tipping points. Meaning more water is removed than replaced during a decade long study 2003-2013.
 
Included in the list is the Canning aquifer which extends from North of Broome, down to Port Headland and 1000 kilometres inland.
There is not an infinite water supply said NASA’s senior water scientist Jay Famiglietti.
 
Groundwater basins in distress in USA and Canada and throughout the world. http://go.nasa.gov/1HRoYZs






Vietnam hit by worst drought in nearly a century.

Months of below-average rainfall have conspired to produce the worst drought in Vietnam in the best part of 100 years.



Vietnam has suffered $6.7 billion in damage from its 2016 drought, which has hit farmers especially hard in the crucial southern Mekong Delta. This cost is approximately 4% of Vietnam's GDP, and beats the $785 million cost (2009 USD) of Typhoon Ketsana of September 28, 2009 for most expensive disaster in their history. In this image, we see a boy holding his brother walking across a drought-hit rice field in Long Phu district, southern delta province of Soc Trang on March 2, 2016.
Here are the nations that have set records in February 2016 for their most expensive weather-related natural disaster in history.


Thailand Drought

Thailand to drill 4,300 wells as drought hits hard

Almost $100m redirected for urgent construction of wells to supply drinking and washing water after lengthy shortage.

Worsening drought could prove another headache for Thailand's military government [Barbara Walton/EPA]. Thai authorities are rushing to drill thousands of wells across the country to ensure enough water for drinking and washing, as farmers grapple with a drought and a months-long water shortage.

Authorities examined the water supply and demand nationwide and decided to drill 4,300 more wells, said Suphot Tovichakchaikul, secretary of the National Water Board, which comprises water officials and is chaired by the prime minister.